Talmudic reasoning

'The Midrash BEN ISH HAI Message and Discussion Area': Other Jewish Religious Topics: Talmudic reasoning
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jack (Jack)

Wednesday, June 07, 2000 - 02:23 pm Click here to edit this post
Does anyone know any books that can help me in my
search for the knowledge of Talmudic reasoning?
pilpul77@hotmail.com

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Abba Kuyenov (Abbakohen)

Saturday, June 10, 2000 - 11:21 pm Click here to edit this post
Hi Jack:
There are fer Sefarim you can get written by Rav Moshe Haiim Luzzato, called The Way of Reason (Derech Tevunuth), or The Book of Logic (Sefer haHig'yon), the sequel to the privious title. The first sefer is "The Classic Guid to Talmud Study", the second one is "The Guide In-Depth Talmud Study." I hope that is what yo wanted....you can probably purchase these books in most of the Judaica stores.

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jack (Jack)

Monday, June 12, 2000 - 03:03 pm Click here to edit this post
Thank you Abba Kuyenov very much for the titles
of those two books. I am on my way...

From,Jack.
pilpul77@hotmail.com

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zaakiman (Zaakiman)

Monday, June 12, 2000 - 03:10 pm Click here to edit this post
I am studying Derech Tevunot and Sefer hahigayon right now and I find them to be AMAZING! But I have a few questions...AbbaKohen, are you familiar enough with them to answer a few of my questions? Jack, these books are incredibly important. AbbaKohen, do you know of other books that deal with the same subject?
zaakiman@netscape.net

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Abba Kuyenov (Abbakohen)

Tuesday, June 13, 2000 - 09:44 pm Click here to edit this post
hey people,

I have never read those books, but the way i know the titles is when this Shabuoth I went to my friends house, i happen to run into those books. I was emazed that Rav Haim Moshe Luzato actually wrote on that topic, because i know few other Sefarim that he wrote like Mesillath Yeshareem (The Path of Just) and Derech Hashem (The way of G-d) that talk about Musar the morals of the person, way in a different field.

P.S. Now i know why Hashem made me run into those titles, its because I was somehow to tell it to you!

Have a good one!

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Abraham Mitsarfat (Abraham)

Tuesday, November 26, 2002 - 08:25 am Click here to edit this post
Greetings Jack

"Ein Yacob" (the well of Jacob)is a good introduction for the Talmud, at least in my opinion. It is a collection of Aggadot taken from the all sections of the Guemara.

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David Ben-Abraham (Yemenite)

Wednesday, September 21, 2005 - 10:10 am Click here to edit this post
B"H
If anyone wishes to know how the Gemara was traditionally studied in Yemen, the following excerpt from Rabbi Yoseph Qafih's Preface to the Babylonian Talmud is being pasted here:
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
"I will mention here the method [used in our] study of the Gemara. For in a similar arrangement, more or less, was also the [method employed by us in our] study of Halakhah. The Rabbi reads first the Mishnah, and explains it in all of its aspects, according to his ability, and according to the level [of understanding] of his listeners. Already at this stage, he begins to make known certain fine points and new lessons to be derived from the Gemara, in a straight forward manner [of speech]. Even in those places where Rashi writes [the words], 'In the Gemara it has been explained,' the Rabbi summarizes, with brevity, that which is to be said in the Gemara. After this, the entire congregation reads together the designated portion of Gemara relating to that Mishnah, in unison and in the same peculiar melodious tune employed in the recitation of the Gemara, while the Rabbi with another three or four of his more experienced students will raise their voices in a careful and didactic, punctilious-way of reading [in order to instruct others] how the text is supposed to be read; the [sound of] exclamation in its [proper] place [and] the sound of a declarative statement where it rightfully belongs; the question said with its [peculiar] melody, and the answer [given] in the intonation associated with it. The rest of the congregation is being guided by them, and they march along with them, so-to-speak, from the stand point of 'I will explain and expound the matter before thee.'... Afterwards, the Rabbi repeats the same reading of the Gemara without explanation, while all the students put their eyes on the books before them, and their ears are [attentively inclined] to that which proceeds forth from the mouth of the Rabbi, in order to capture its sounds and to retain the correct order of punctuation in the reading... After he finishes, the Rabbi once again repeats the reading, with Rashi's Commentary, [and] with the addition of drawn out explanatory remarks of his own.
In those places where Maimonides, in his Commentary on the Mishnah or in his Composition, has explained a matter differently from Rashi, the Rabbi does not say, 'But Maimonides explains such and such.' Rather, he will say, 'It seems to me that Maimonides did not explain it this way. Let us bring the book and see.' Then he takes a look at Maimonides, reads [from] his words [out loud] before all the listeners, and presently attempts with the most skillful of his students to show how Maimonides' words are congruent with the Gemara, ...as if he is trying for the first time, together with them, to discover the path trod by Maimonides- to find out and to locate that point which brought about diverging [paths] in the [two] commentaries, etc..."


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